Archive for March, 2014

Food News Fast – March 31, 2014

Food News Fast – March 31, 2014

Many farm-working aliens commute as much as 9 hours to get to their jobs. [NBC] Florida’s citrus growers may have a second chance with this Asian tree. [Modern Farmer] Climate change is giving another advantage to invasive weeds – and ranchers don’t like it. [NPR] An argument for GMO labeling being about consumer choice – not safety. [Huffington Post] Immigration reform is a boon to farmers and undocumented workers alike. [Civil Eats] The ACLU is […]

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March 31, 2014 at 9:44 amFood News Fast News

One Million Bottles of Peanut Butter Dumped

One Million Bottles of Peanut Butter Dumped

Peanut butter is having a hard couple of years. In 2009, the Peanut Corporation of America’s salmonella-contaminated peanut butter sickened 700 people and left 9 dead. In 2012, another salmonella outbreak – this time from Sunland Inc. – and the ensuing recall caused the company to go bankrupt. But those companies usually have a lot of peanuts left that pose no food safety risk at all. What happens to all the peanut butter after an outbreak? […]

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March 28, 2014 at 12:19 pmNews

Northeast – Honey-Baked Salmon on a Bed of Fresh Spring Greens

Northeast – Honey-Baked Salmon on a Bed of Fresh Spring Greens

To a New Englander almost nothing is more welcome after the months of gray skies and relentless snow and ice that characterize our winter than the arrival of the first spring salad greens. The winter of 2014 was so particularly long, cold, and snowy that I volunteered to plant seeds at my local CSA just to be in the presence of something green and growing. After 3 hours of dropping beet and kohlrabi seeds into […]

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March 27, 2014 at 11:25 amNortheast Seasonal Recipes

Put a Farm on It!

Put a Farm on It!

Urban farming is the kudzu of local food. First we had community gardens and backyard tomatoes. Then the guerrilla gardeners came, clandestinely planting food in unused lots or in the corners of public parks. The unused city rooftops became commercial success stories, planted with acres of fresh lettuces, tomatoes, and peppers. But now that urban farming has reached train station roofs, we can safely assume that any spare surface could be growing food in the […]

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March 26, 2014 at 2:22 pmAgriculture

Food Science 101 – The Perfect Steak

Food Science 101 – The Perfect Steak

There’s no real right way to cook. Taste is highly variable from person to person and the idea of “good” food is subjective at best. That said there are a couple qualities that most carnivores agree a cut of meat ought to have. By optimizing each desirable trait with good science, we can get close to perfection. A crisp, well-seasoned crust is a necessity. When a steak of pork chop hits a hot pan the natural […]

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March 26, 2014 at 8:00 amCulture

Three Tables: Cooking as Community

Three Tables: Cooking as Community

There is a big wooden table in my backyard at home. It represents what I value most in life. Actually, there are three big wooden tables in three different backyards that represent what I value most in life. The first belongs to my parents, the second belongs to the Strausses, and the third to the Hugginses—both families that are close friends with mine. They were each hand-built by John Huggins, and like him, they are […]

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March 25, 2014 at 9:35 amCulture

Food News Fast – March 24, 2014

Food News Fast – March 24, 2014

Rising lime prices – partially due to cartel activity – is starting to affect restaurants and margarita lovers. [NPR] Is the ocean agriculture’s new frontier? [Modern Farmer] Photographer Carleton Watkins helped turn unpopulated Kern County into $6 billion farmland. [New York Times] Rootworms are now resistant to Bt corn. [Wired] Farmers whose herds were destroyed in the October 2013 blizzard are given new hope this calving season. [Tri-City Herald] Gastrodiplomacy offers up new lessons on […]

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March 24, 2014 at 12:33 pmFood News Fast News

Big-Ag Tours Coming to a Farm Near You

Big-Ag Tours Coming to a Farm Near You

For years, small farmers have had something that has been off-limits to most of Big Ag – the ability to invite people to come see what they do. Though anyone driving through the Midwest has seen a corn or soybean field before, animal agriculture has been mostly hidden. As Michael Pollan wrote in The Omnivore’s Dilemma,  “Sometimes I think that all it would take to clarify our feelings about eating meat, and in the process begin […]

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March 21, 2014 at 9:42 amAgriculture

Where Did the Food Movement Go Wrong?

Where Did the Food Movement Go Wrong?

I should have seen it coming. In a time when politics are more polarized than ever, when every party seems to have their own news station, why would I think the food movement was somehow above sensationalism? I should have known that we were in for a rough ride when we started saying, “Big Ag is evil” and promoted GMO labeling campaigns by insinuating that if Monsanto produced Agent Orange (once reported as being “harmless”), […]

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March 20, 2014 at 1:04 pmCulture

Have You Seen How a Bean Grows?

Have You Seen How a Bean Grows?

When you get below the soil, bean sprouts look like little white worms. That’s what I learned after watching this film from the Prelinger Archives. Originally a silent film from the 1920s, it was made by Urban-Kineto Corporation using time-lapse photography. We added a little soundtrack to help you watch this bean grow! Table Scraps is a Food Politic column dedicated to the small morsels of stories, videos, and more. They don’t have enough calories for a […]

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March 19, 2014 at 8:00 amColumns Table Scraps